Flight of the Bumblebee II

Related imageOmani Resef Yeman was one of the great diplomats and strategists of his time. He helped bring a time of peace and prosperity to the hive that would remain the glowing standard for diplomacy. One of his major accomplishments was shifting their focus on energy renewal and making the hive energy independent. It took a concerted effort, but he managed to influence powerful lobbies that had maintained familiar policies for years.

His son, Mulalli Actuhm, grew up admiring his father’s hard work, until years down the road when it was all dismantled. Omani Resef Yeman, at the height of his power, suffered a debilitating disease that effected several hives around the planet. It made bees act irrationally, suffering from a form of dementia that made them wander out alone in the world and forget how to get back. It effected their noses and made them lose the scent of the hive, as well as their own.

Other bees will attack each other if their scent is not closely aligned with their own. It doesn’t necessarily mean they have to have the same scent. The scent has to be close enough.

Omani was forced to settle into being nothing, as his condition became much worse. He suffered for a while, before ending his own life. He cannibalized with an inner-city neighborhood and was absorbed into the hive.

Mulalli hadn’t agreed with his father on several issues, but he did admire how he worked with others and managed to have what success he could, even against powerful foes. His father always found a way. Where they differed was in the politics. Mulalli believed that, no matter how hard they worked, those in power would always be able to keep them down. He used his father’s success to show the failure of politics. His father worked his entire career for the queen and her people and all of that came crashing down. The lobbies eviscerated his policies and the queen suffered. It wasn’t long until she became alienated by her people and the assurance of a populist revolt came to pass.

‘The Third Eye’, a group of revolutionaries led by Visyei Kislyah, received the label of a ‘terror cell’, after its attack on Lot 570xG. It didn’t take long for some of the main aspects of the group to dissolve, having seen the ugliness of the reaction to their crimes. Some warned the queen of the dissent, while others went into hiding. A lot of them ended up dead, with those in power blaming a deadly nerve agent, but always some form of ‘coincidence’ or ‘accidental poisoning’.

Visyei remained a pertinent threat for years, but always nothing more than a threat. He became a ‘boogey man’, used to scare the population into behaving and not venturing too far from its leadership, for fear that the ‘Third Eye’ would see them. When he met Mulalli, the threat became a reality. Visyei Kislyah maintained an underground network to sustain himself and further his political power, managing to unite various outlying groups that wouldn’t have joined his cause before. The hammer that came down against The Third Eye served as a political beacon for those who would act. They were forced to act faster than they wanted and thus mobilized to defend Visyei before it was too late.

The result was a number of attacks on civilians, not only by the Third Eye, but various paramilitary groups and even those in power. The scourge of violence drove the bees to madness, as the attacks came one after another, leaving no discernible enemy. The groups came and went, but none were ever defeated. More came up, suffering some indignity from their leaders and proving that they’d rather die than continue in this manner. The government took this as an opportunity to clear out some of the less desirable neighborhoods. A virus was infecting several communities that led to a severe bout of dementia, which had also infected Omani Resef Yeman, and they hoped to put it to an end.

Mulalli Actuhm helped lead the revolution, while Visyei did the same behind closed doors. Mulalli was the perfect figurehead. His people rallied behind him and, in this way, a populist revolt came about that never had a chance at success. The populists were equipped with a wide array of rifles and automatic weapons, but none of that mattered when their government had napalm. It took only a few hours for the revolution to end, one fateful day, when it was too quiet. The queen, sensing the collapse, enacted a lethal toxin that killed thousands of her people. The collapse was far too much and the hive could no longer be sustained.

It took only a matter of hours for the hive to collapse in its entirety. The upper strata escaped first, of course, leaving the lesser sects of their society to ‘sink with the ship’. After all, it would only make sense, that those who sought a ‘populist revolution’ to be held responsible.

Now, the hive and its future has become a riddle. The world is interested because all the bees are dying, when, in reality, they’ve lost their faith. They can’t imagine any reasons to unite, rebuild the hive and start all over. It doesn’t seem like all that effort will be put to good use. This is a generation of bees that grew up during a time of mass corruption and greed. For as much as they don’t want the same fate for their future, they also can’t think of how to keep it from happening. They don’t know another way, so, they wait.

Mulalli Actuhm lives a quiet life, despite the infamy of being responsible for the collapse of an entire culture. Most bees are learning to survive as something else. They don’t want to be bees. They live solitary lives, although they all work the same and perform the same tasks. Most bees have learned to make tunnels in the dirt to serve as permanent hovels. They live in close proximity to their brothers, but the connection between them has been lost. A new hive is the furthest thing from their minds.

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